JerryBrownPR
303.594.8016

Archive for November 2014

Storytelling Tip: Break it up

 

Storytelling Tip: Break it up

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Breaking up can help your storyBreaking up is hard to do. But it can make your story stronger.

I’m not suggesting you break up with your spouse or lover. I am suggesting you break your story up — especially if it’s packed with a lot of information.

Don’t overwhelm your audience by trying to say too much all at once.

If you do many PowerPoint presentations, you’ve probably heard the suggestion that breaking one information-loaded slide into two or three slides can make your presentation stronger — and easier for your audience to understand.

It’s no different when telling your story in writing. Or with videos.

I’m working on a video project for a client. The original plan was to produce a single video.

We could have put all his messages into one video. But it would have been too long. We’ll end up instead with four one-minute videos, each making a single point. The four parts are much stronger broken apart than they would have been lumped together.

When you’re getting to know someone, you generally share information back and forth in increments — not in one overwhelming data dump.

You’re telling your story to help your audience get to know you or something about your business. Doing that in bite-sized pieces usually is more effective than trying to say it all at once.

We all have stories to tell. Do you need help telling yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist who helps clients get their stories heard, understood and remembered. Need help telling your story? You can reach Jerry at 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Storytelling Tip: No Sales Pitch

 

Storytelling Tip: No Sales Pitch

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Counsel
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: No Sales PitchSometimes the best sales pitch is no sales pitch.

We’ve all been subjected to the pressure tactics of a hard sales pitch at some time or another. Most of us have given in at least a time or two and bought what the arm twister was selling. And then regretted our decision.

But most of us are pretty good at turning away high-pressure salespeople. We turn them away because they turn us off.

As someone in the business world, you usually tell your story in hopes the rest of us will buy what you’re selling. Nothing wrong with that. If I’m in the market for what you sell, I want to hear what you have to say — as long as you don’t try too hard to “sell” me.

Several years ago, I was in the market for a new car. I started shopping early, several months before I planned to buy. And I made that clear right up front to all the salespeople I met with.

All but one of them heard me. They told me about the cars they had to offer. Let me test drive them. And said they’d love to hear from me when I was ready to buy. No arm twisting. No pressure. No “sales” pitch. But one guy wouldn’t let go. He made it sound like there wouldn’t be any cars left if I didn’t buy one today. And today’s deal wouldn’t be around if I didn’t drive home today in one of the cars on his lot. I had to make a decision today. Sell. Sell. Sell.

He did get me to make a decision that day: To eliminate him and his dealership from further consideration.

Tell your story. Make it relevant to your audience by telling us what you can do for us, why you have something interesting to say to us.

You want us to buy what you’re selling. That’s okay. Perfectly normal. Sometimes the best way to get us to do that is to skip the sales pitch.

We all have stories to tell. Do you need help telling yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist who helps clients get their stories heard, understood and remembered. Need help telling your story? You can reach Jerry at 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Writing Tip: 5 Ways to Improve Your Message

 

Writing Tip: 5 Ways to Improve Your Message

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Counsel
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Writing Tip: 5 Ways to Improve Your MessageWe all have stories to tell. The challenge is to get them heard, understood and remembered.

Here are some tips for improving your chances of successfully meeting that challenge.

Writing Tip #1: Tell me a story. We’re all natural story tellers. It’s how we communicate. In fact, some scientists say it’s the fundamental instrument of thought. We think in story form. So, why have I included it in these tips? As a reminder not to let the facts get in the way of your story. I’m not suggesting you play fast and loose with the truth. I’m suggesting you avoid loading your story down with so many facts that you and your audience lose sight of your story — the narrative that will help us understand and remember your message.

Writing Tip #2: Make your story about me. Make your story relevant to your audience. We want to know if you’re the person or company we want to do business with. But what we really want to know is how you’re going to help us. The more your story focuses on you, the less interested the rest of us will be. So make your story about your audience. Not about you.

Writing Tip #3: Surprise me. We’re hardwired to notice things that surprise or startle us. It’s a survival mechanism. Sometimes people think they’re supposed to use some kind of template for their news releases, blogs or other things they write. That’s a formula for making what you say blend into the background. You want your story to stand out. Get noticed. Tell us something we don’t know. Give us a new perspective on something we do know. Tell us why something we think we know is wrong and what the real facts are. Surprise us with your opening to get our attention. And tell us something that makes us say (or think) “I didn’t know that.” If you can do that, we’re more likely to remember what you said.

Writing Tip #4: Make one less point. Do you ever find yourself thinking you just need to make one more point to convince us you’re right? That’s a good way to let the facts get in the way of your story. Most of the time you’ll be better off making one less point. It’s called editing. Take a look at what you’ve written. What can you take out? Keep your story simple. It’ll be easier to understand. And easier to remember.

Writing Tip #5: See Tip #4.

We all have stories to tell. Do you need help telling yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist who helps clients get their stories heard, understood and remembered. Need help telling your story? You can reach Jerry at 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Denver PR Firm, APR Credentials
JerryBrownPR member of South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce

Contact Jerry

Jerry@JerryBrownPR.com | 303.594.8016