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Archive for May 2013

Presentation Tip: Turn your story into an Indiana Jones movie

 

Presentation Tip: Turn your story into an Indiana Jones movie
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Storytelling Tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Presentation Tip: Turn your story into an Indian Jones movieWant to do some research for your next presentation? Watch one of the early Indiana Jones movies. And then use it as a template for what you say.

Here’s the formula: Once the action starts, Indiana Jones goes from one heart-thumping, hold-your-breath-because-he’s-about-to-die episode to another. And as soon as he narrowly escapes the danger he’s in and you think you can relax and take a deep breath, you’re pulled into the next he’s-done-for-sure-this-time action. And it keeps your attention right up to the closing credits.

In the Indiana Jones movies, the action revolves around Indiana Jones, his female lead or someone else he cares about being in immediate, seemingly insurmountable danger.

I’m not suggesting you put your audience in jeopardy — real or imagined. But you do want to find ways to re-engage their interest and their emotions at regular intervals.

Here’s how John Medina puts it in his book Brain Rules (with a few side notes from me):

  •  “Our brains don’t pay attention to boring things.” (And your audience won’t pay attention to you if you’re boring.)
  • “The more attention the brain pays to a given stimulus, the more elaborately the information will be encoded — and retained.” (Want us to remember what you’re saying? If all you’re using is your voice and you’re droning on and on and on, our butts may still be in our seats but our minds will be somewhere else.)
  • “Novel stimuli — the unusual, unpredictable, or distinctive — are powerful ways to harness attention.” (All that predictable stuff you’re tempted to say? It’s probably boring. For the problem with that, check out the first bullet point.)
  • “The brain remembers the emotional components of an experience better than any other aspect.” (A well-constructed, purely logical argument may be difficult to rebut. But it’s also hard to remember.)
  • “The most common communication mistakes? Relating too much information, with not enough time devoted to connecting the dots. Lots of force-feeding, very little digestion. This does nothing for the nourishment of the listeners.”
  • “Audiences check out after 10 minutes, but you can keep grabbing them back by telling narratives or creating events rich in emotion.” (Find a way to re-engage your audience every 10 minutes. Good anecdotes and examples are two ways to do that.)

Think of your story as a roller coaster. It starts with a tension-filled climb to that first big adrenaline rush as you plummet down the first big drop-off. A good opening is like that . Grabs you right from the beginning. That first drop sends your stomach up toward your forehead, grabs your attention and gets your heart rate up. But if that’s all there is, it’ll be a pretty boring ride from there. See bullet one for the problem with that. That great opening you have? Super. But if it’s all you’ve got to grab our attention, you’ll lose us long before you’re done talking. Have fun. And help your audience fun. Because if they’re having fun, they’ll pay attention. And remember.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

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Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 10:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

Dolls for Daughters Golf Tournament: Play Hooky for a Good Cause

 

Dolls for Daughters Golf Tournament: Play Hooky for a Good Cause

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Dolls for Daughters Golf Tournament: Play Hooky for a Good CauseEverything that’s fun, tastes good or feels good is sinful, fattening or bad for you it seems.

So, I’m looking forward to a guilt-free day of playing hooky from work on June 14 to play golf.

Why don’t you join me? It’ll be fun.

I’ll be playing in the third annual Dolls for Daughters golf tournament at The Ridge at Castle Pines North in Castle Rock.

If you haven’t heard of Dolls for Daughters, it’s the brainchild of Jessica Bachus who turned the loss of a daughter six years ago into a cause that makes Christmas a little happier for thousands of needy girls and boys every year. Last December, more than 3,000 needy kids received new toys along with new books, toothbrushes and other goodies at Dolls for Daughters’ annual Toy Shop.

So think about it. For $175, you get: A chance to take a day off from work. Play one of Colorado’s premier golf courses. And make Christmas happier for more than 3,000 kids.

What could be better? Prizes. Lots of them. For example, there are some club-level seats for a Colorado Rockies baseball game. Worth 500 bucks, I’m told. They were donated by Bachus & Schanker, the law firm where Jessica’s husband works.

You can also win tickets to a Denver Broncos football game plus an assortment of loot provided by Comedy Works, Reserve Casino, Canongate Colorado, Denver Zoo, JP Lizy, Oogave, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Royal Gorge Bridge & Park, Howl at the Moon, Blake Street Tavern, Blues Jean Bar, Rocky Mountain Laser, Ocean Prime, Woody Creek Bakery and Cafe, Tootsies, Dr. Lee Weisbard (she’s a dentist who’s offering to help you whiten your teeth), Vine Street Pub, Brad Nicol, Four Leaf Chopped Salads, Luigi’s Italian Restaurant, Big Bill’s New York Pizza, Renzio’s, Pots Tea Cafe’ & Market, Salsa Brava, St. Bon’s and Melalecua Sun Pack.

Still not enough? Angel Tuccy and Eric Reamer will be broadcasting their Experience Pros Radio Show live from the tournament, which means you’ll have a chance to be on the radio and mention your business. KB Digital Designs will be taking photographs. And there’s a free lunch.

So, now the offer is: A chance to take the day off from work, spend the day playing on one of Colorado’s premier golf courses, help make Christmas happier for more than 3,000 kids, get your picture taken, get a free lunch, have a shot at getting on the radio and have a chance to win some great prizes. Well, except for the baseball tickets. I’m going to win those. That’s my plan. My plans don’t always work out. Sigh.

You’re considering it, but you’re a lousy golfer. That’s okay. So am I. It doesn’t matter. They’re doing a shotgun start at 8 a.m. That means everyone starts at once. And it’s one of those best ball scrambles where you hit your ball into the weeds and then everyone on your team hits from the fairway where the showoff good golfer on your team landed.

The law of averages being what it is, you’ll eventually hit at least one shot that qualifies as the best ball and you get bragging rights about how your shot was better than the one by the really good player(s) on your team. That one shot is worth the price of admission. Trust me. Been there, done that.

Now that you’ve decided to play, go here to sign up. You can also become a sponsor, which will make you feel even better about yourself and help those kids out even more.

AiO TV has already signed up as the Presenting Sponsor with a generous contribution of $7,500. For $5,000, you can become a Gold Sponsor, which includes two foursomes, shirts for each of your golfers and all kinds of advertising opportunities. For $2,500, you can join Dynalectric as a Silver Sponsor, which includes two foursomes, shirts for each of your golfers and other stuff. For $1,250, you can join Mike Miller CPA, Filsinger Energy Partners and Jones & Keller as a Bronze Sponsor, which includes one foursome with shirts for each of them and other stuff. For $300, you can join Benson and Case, FreeSpirit Concepts and JerryBrownPR (that’s me) as a Birdie Sponsor. For $150 you can join Centennial Leasing and Sales as a Par Sponsor.

And for a cool $1,000,000 we’ll name the tournament for you for life and let you play Santa Claus at the Dolls for Daughters Toy Shop in December.

Storytelling Tip: Repeat Yourself

 

Storytelling Tip: Repeat yourself
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Storytelling Tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Repeat YourselfWant the rest of us to remember your message? Repeat yourself. Often.

If you’ve ever been a speechwriter or done much speaking in front of audiences, you’ve probably heard this sage piece of advice: Tell them what you’re going tell them, tell them, and then tell them what you told them. That’s about repeating yourself. And why would you do that? Because your audience will forget 90 percent of what you said within a few hours. They’ll forget most of it almost immediately. And repetition is one of the ways to help your audience remember what you said. So, a good speaker with a message s/he wants you to remember will repeat that message several times.

Anyone who has lived in Denver for any length of time knows who Jake Jabs and Dealin’ Doug are. Jake Jabs owns a chain of furniture stores. Dealin’ Doug sells cars. Their ads, featuring Jake and Doug personally, are on TV. A lot. If you live in Denver, you know exactly who I’m talking about. If you live somewhere else, you still know exactly who I’m talking about because every major city in America has someone just like them.

There’s nothing special about their ads except for the frequent repetition. Dealin’ Doug spends his 30 seconds to a minute shouting about his low prices. Jake doesn’t shout and sometimes brings exotic animals onto the set with him. But the only things you’re likely to remember about what he says is that he has more furniture and lower prices than anyone else.

What’s your message? If you want us to remember it, repeat yourself. Often.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 10:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

Presentation Tip: Present Naked

 

Presentation Tip: Present Naked
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s storytelling tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Presentation Tip: Present NakedThe next time you speak to an audience consider presenting naked.

Don’t worry. You can keep your clothes on. Presenting naked is a term used by Garr Reynolds in his latest book, The Naked Presenter: Delivering Powerful Presentations With or Without Slides.

As he describes it, “presenting naked means connecting and engaging with an audience, whether three people or three thousand, in a way that is direct, honest and clear.”

How do you do that? Don’t deliver a “speech.” Have a conversation with your audience.

If you have the option of doing so, get out from behind the lectern and move around. Make eye contact. Do everything you can to break through that invisible wall separating speaker and audience.

Be human. Be vulnerable. Be yourself.

Fear of speaking in front of an audience is a common phobia. The fear comes from viewing the experience as a performance. If you need to perform, it’s important not to make mistakes.

So, don’t perform. Talk with your audience. That doesn’t mean you have to engage in a two-way conversation, although that’s a good idea if your material lends itself to a dialogue.

“Think of your presentation as a ‘large conversation’ instead of a performance or speech,” Reynolds suggests in his book. That’s good advice.

Having a conversation with your audience isn’t about winging it. You need to prepare. You need to know your material so well that you can deliver it without constantly referring to your notes.

But make your audience feel they’re listening to a real, live human being who’s in the room with them. And let your audience know that you know they’re real, live human beings in the room with you.

Don’t deliver a speech. Talk to them.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

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Contact Jerry

Jerry@JerryBrownPR.com | 303.594.8016