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Archive for April 2013

Storytelling Tip: Be quotable to be remembered

 

Storytelling Tip: Be quotable to be remembered
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Storytelling Tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Be quotable to be rememberedBe quotable to be remembered.

We’re drawn to good quotes because they represent a clever, memorable way of saying something. Memorable is the key word here. Good quotes are easy to remember. And they have impact because they express a truth easily recognized and accepted.

Mark Twain and Will Rogers became famous by delivering one-liners about the human condition and the politics of their day. And many of their comments, including topical political comments you might expect to become dated, are just as true today as they were when they were alive.

We’ve all heard Mark Twain’s famous line that “the reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.”

Some other great quotes, some you’ll recognize and some you won’t:

  • “A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way.” — Mark Twain
  • “The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.” — Mark Twain
  • “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” — Will Rogers
  • “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” — Winston Churchill
  • “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead.” — Admiral David Farragut

Every one of those quotes have two things in common. They’re short, one or two sentences. And they express a truth that’s easy to understand and accept.

Company taglines are another example of quotable quotes. For example:

  • The pause that refreshes. — Coca Cola
  • Don’t leave home without it. — American Express
  • Just do it. — Nike

We’re bombarded with information every day. We make sense of that by ignoring the stuff we aren’t interested in and simplifying the stuff we are interested in so we can remember it. Being quotable helps grab our attention and makes it easier for us to remember what you said.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

Storytelling Tip: The power of anecdotes

 

Storytelling Tip: The power of Anecdotes
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Storytelling Tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: The power of anecdotesAnecdotes can add huge impact to your story.

Consider the events surrounding the Boston Marathon bombing, for example.

You can tell the story of the week following the Boston bombing with a broad brush: Explosions. Shock. Photos of the suspects in the black and white hats. High-speed chase. Daylong search. And the capture.

But it’s the personal anecdotes — the hero in the cowboy hat, 8-year-old Martin Richard’s “no more hurting people . . . peace” poster, or add your favorite example here — that add depth and poignancy to the story.

Every one of us was touched by one or more of these personal, human interest stories — anecdotes — that emerged as the events following the Boston bombing unfolded. And each of us has our personal collection of these stories that we remember from what happened in Boston.

Some of the details we remember are shared — things we read or saw on TV. Some are more personal, based on being in Boston or knowing someone who was for example.

Here’s my point: You recognize the high-level, broad-brush version I outlined above. But it’s often the smaller, personal-interest stories that have the biggest impact on us.

And that’s not true just of the Boston bombing. It’s true all kinds of events or experiences. When a close friend or relative dies, for example, you may read their obituary summarizing their life and listing their survivors. But it’s the memory and stories about their quirks and personality that touch us.

Anecdotes are powerful storytelling tools. They humanize your story. Use them whenever you can to humanize your story and make it more interesting.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

_____

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

Storytelling Tip: Be a Problem Solver

 

Storytelling Tips: Be a problem solver
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Storytelling Tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Be a Problem SolverOne good way to get attention for your story: Solve a problem or create an opportunity for the rest of us.

Solving a problem or creating an opportunity are flip sides of the same thing. And doing one or the other — or both — for enough people to make a living is what keeps most of us in business.

So, help the rest of us clearly understand the problem you solve or the opportunity you create.

If it’s a problem I’m interested in solving or an opportunity I’m interested in taking advantage of, I’ll be interested in what you say.

If it’s a problem a lot of people are interested in solving or an opportunity a lot of people are interested in taking advantage of, a lot of people will be interested in what you say.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

Storytelling Tip: Be a Generous Tipper

 

Storytelling Tips: Be a generous tipper
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Storytelling Tips on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Consultant
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Be a Generous TipperDevelop a reputation for being a generous tipper and you’re almost certain to get great service and a lot of attention whenever you visit any of your favorite establishments where the staff knows you and relies on tips.

Develop a reputation for being a generous tipper when telling your story and you’ll develop a following among people interested in what you do — and you’ll enhance your reputation as an expert in your field.

We’re all looking for ways to improve. And one of the ways we do that is by paying attention to tips from experts who offer advice about how to do things we want to learn how to do or become able to do better.

There was a time when newspapers were bigger and had more writers that I could count on seeing at least one “tips” story in any paper I picked up — “how to,” “five ways to” and so on. And while there aren’t as many of these stories as there once were, you’ll still find a lot of tips in newspapers, magazines and online.

The reason news organizations like stories that offer expert advice — tips — is they know their audience likes them.

So, follow their lead. Be a generous tipper when telling your story. If you offer good advice about things the rest of us want to know, you’ll get our attention. And you’ll build your reputation as an expert at what you do.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros Radio Show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet. Missed it on the air? Listen to the archived tips.

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Jerry@JerryBrownPR.com | 303.594.8016