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Archive for November 2012

Get Your Story Heard, Understood and Remembered

 

Get Your Story Heard, Understood and Remembered
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Tips for Telling Your Story on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Counsel
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Get Your Story Heard, Understood and RememberedI often describe what I do as getting your story heard, understood and remembered. But what does that mean? And what do you need to do to get your story heard, understood and remembered?

Get your story heard

It doesn’t matter how good your message is if the people you’re trying to reach don’t see it or hear it.

There was a time when getting a story published in your local newspaper or advertising in your local newspaper and on the three or four local TV stations blanketed your local market.

And national advertisers could reach most Americans by advertising on the three national TV networks.

With the Internet, hundreds of cable channels, video games and all the other entertainment and information outlets competing for our attention, it’s a little harder today to reach everyone. And you may not even care about reaching everyone. You want to reach those of us who are potential customers for what you’re selling.

Another challenge in getting your story heard is that we’re all bombarded daily with thousands of marketing messages. So, we’ll tune your message out unless you deliver it in a way that’s interesting enough for us to pay attention to it.

To get your story heard, your challenge is to figure out who your audience is, how to reach them and how to deliver your message in a way that they’ll be interested enough to pay attention.

Get your story understood

Do you know what your message is? Can you say it in about 15 seconds? If you don’t understand your own message how do you expect the rest of us to understand it?

The 15-second rule is about making sure your message is simple enough for the rest of us to understand it. The longer it takes you to explain your message, the less likely the rest of us are to understand it.

Keep it simple. Sounds easy. But it isn’t. It’s easy to take a simple idea and make it complicated. People do that all the time. It’s much harder to take a complicated idea and explain it simply. That’s your challenge when crafting your message.

Get your story remembered

You reached your audience and they understand what you had to say. Congratulations. But it won’t do you any good if they don’t remember it. Giving us a reason to care about what you said will make us more likely to remember it. Making your message visual and concrete (instead of abstract) also makes it easier to remember.

Having a message is easy. We all have at least one. Getting it heard, understood and remembered is the challenge.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

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Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros radio show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet.

Storytelling Tip: Use the calendar to tell your story

 

Storytelling Tip: Use the calendar to tell your story
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Tips for Telling Your Story on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Counsel
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Use the calendar to tell your storyHappy Thanksgiving. I love Thanksgiving traditions — turkey and dressing, mashed potatoes, cranberries, pumpkin pie, the food-induced coma at the end of the day.

And, of course, Butterball University giving its annual save-your-turkey tips on national television. Some people watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. I watch the folks from Butterball tell the rest of us how to save our holiday feast.

It’s a perfect example of how to use the calendar to tell your story. Butterball’s turkey experts have been staffing phone lines since 1981 to help desperate cooks on Thanksgiving and Christmas. And the rest of the year, too. But they aren’t on national TV then.

Somewhere along the way an overachieving marketer created the term Butterball University to describe the training for the company’s Turkey Talk-Line experts. The head of the unit became the dean of Butterball University. And a zillion headlines and TV appearances were born.

The calendar contains a wealth of opportunities to tell your story. August is ripe for back-to-school and other education-related stories. New Year’s is a good time for stories about all those things people can do to improve themselves. Anniversaries, holidays and changing seasons all lend themselves to telling your story — including some you can turn into news stories — if you’re creative enough and paying attention to your calendar.

One of my “favorite” examples is an opportunity missed. I was on the corporate PR staff of one of the Baby Bell phone companies for many years. One morning as we sat around brainstorming story ideas one of my colleagues jokingly suggested we should celebrate Alexander Graham Bell’s 150th birthday, which was that very day.

Everyone laughed at his little joke. Except me. I realized it was an opportunity lost. With enough planning, we could have thrown old Alex a heck of a party and featured some of the latest gadgets we had to sell to show how much things had changed since his day.

Don’t miss your opportunity to use the calendar to tell your story.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros radio show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet.

Storytelling Tip: Be an expert

 

Storytelling Tip: Be an expert
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Tips for Telling Your Story on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Counsel
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Be an expertAre you good at what you do? If so, you know more about what you do than the rest of us. That makes you an expert.

And if you do or sell something I need, then I’m counting on your expertise. Because I want the best I can get for my money.

When it comes to telling your story there’s nothing more powerful than being an expert — and sharing your expertise with the rest of us who need your help. That’s why stories that offer tips are so popular with journalists. They know their readers or viewers are interested in useful tips about all kinds of things.

Becoming a recognized expert in your field is a worthy goal. But if you’re in a business that has a lot of competitors — and most of us are — then you won’t be alone. There are other experts, too. Then your challenge is to tell your story well enough that we do business with you — not with one of those other experts you’re competing with.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros radio show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet.

Storytelling Tip: Know when to shut up

 

Storytelling Tip: Know when to shut up
Today’s tip from JerryBrownPR’s Tips for Telling Your Story on the Experience Pros Radio Show
Listen to the Radio Version

By Jerry Brown, APR
Public Relations Counsel
www.JerryBrownPR.com

Storytelling Tip: Know when to shut upToday’s tip is inspired by the end of campaign season: Know when to shut up. Or, more politely, when to keep quiet.

No matter how interested you are in the outcome of the election and no matter who you’re supporting, you probably won’t miss all those ads and robocalls.

Politicians are always going to campaign right up until election day. We expect that. And we expect them to keep pushing their message at us over and over and over. It’s the tone and the length of the campaigning that wears most of us down.

For most of us, there’s not a day set on the calendar when it will be time to quit telling our story. It’s an ongoing saga that won’t end until we leave the world of business.

But there are times when we’re better off keeping quiet. Or limiting what we have to say to things that don’t have anything to do with selling.

I’m a big advocate of telling your story clearly and often. Repetition is important because most of us won’t hear you the first time you deliver your message.

But we don’t want to be hounded by your message. And we don’t want you pushing yourself on us every time we see you.

So, tell your story. Tell it well. And tell it often. But know when it’s time to keep quiet. Or at least when it’s time to talk about something else. Sometimes silence really is golden.

That’s my two cents’ worth. What’s yours?

————-

Jerry Brown, APR, is a public relations professional and former journalist. He specializes in helping clients develop the content they need to tell their stories. He also helps them develop strategies for getting their stories heard, understood and remembered. And he provides media training and presentation coaching for clients who need to tell their stories to reporters or in front of an audience. 303-594-8016 | jerry@JerryBrownPR.com.

Listen to Jerry’s Tips for Telling Your Story every Tuesday at 11:05 a.m., Mountain Time, on the Experience Pros radio show on KLZ 560AM in Denver or at www.560thesource.com on the Internet.

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Contact Jerry

Jerry@JerryBrownPR.com | 303.594.8016